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Parent Resource Concerning Drugs

Pharmaceuticals

Abuse of prescription drugs is a growing problem among young people in the Mat-Su area. These drugs are very dangerous. Young people may steal the drugs from parents or others or forge prescriptions. The drugs may be taken orally, or crushed and injected or snorted to get high. Common drugs that Palmer Police find abused in our area include: Ritalin, Dexedrine, OxyContin, Darvon, Vicodin, and Valium

Look for: A single pill or groups of pills mixed together in unmarked bottles or baggies, not professionally packaged.

Paraphernalia: dirty spoons and needles, dirty cotton swabs (used to clean the spoon), dirty cotton balls (used as filters for shooting up), mini torches with butane fuel (used to heat up the spoon), snort tubes piece of cut straw, hollow tube of a pen, may have residue inside. Storage: Empty pill bottles or small containers.

Parent Resources: Drug Bibles are books that contain photos and information of pills; available at libraries or local book stores or contact the Poison Control Center 1-800-222-1222.

Heroin

Heroin abuse is something Palmer Police is finding among users as young as high school age, although the percentage of high school age heroin users is estimated to be very, very small.

Look for: Heroin is delivered in tiny pieces of small, colorful toy balloons with the drug wrapped tightly inside. Occasionally it may be wrapped tightly in plastic wrap or foil. A typical user amount of heroin is only the size of a pencil eraser. Tiny bits of plastic, balloons, burned foil or used syringes may be found discarded by users in trash cans. 
Slang: Chiva (cheeva), Black

Paraphernalia: syringes, burned spoons, dirty cotton balls or Q-tips, tie bands (used to tie around an arm before injecting). 

Meth

Palmer Police find meth is one of the most dangerous, widespread drugs abused in our area. Users often begin by snorting the drug, then smoke it, then injected. Crystal Meth is popular now and marketed as more pure, but in reality is no different than colored meth.

Slang: Shards (like shards of glass), Crank, Crystal, CR, Powder. Meth users are Tweekers. Meth is often bought in a T or Teener (1/16th  oz.), or an 8 Ball (1/8th oz.).

Look for: A clear, white or brown powder, white or brown chunky material, or white crystals often kept in zip-lock baggies. Users may have 8-Ball symbols on clothing, key chains or posters. Users may wear ball caps with a "CR" symbol. Users may discard corners of sandwich baggies or grocery bags with small bits ripped off, as well as bits of straws heat sealed at the ends.

Paraphernalia: meth pipes are often made of thin glass and may have dark residue inside. Mini torches (not lighters)  and butane fuel or propane bottles (the type used for camp stoves). Snort tubes piece of cut straw, hollow tube of a pen, may have residue inside. Needles, syringes, dirty spoons and cotton, scales.

Storage: Meth materials are often kept in purple Crown Royal Bags, or other small storage containers, zip-lock baggies with residue. 

Cocaine

Palmer Police find cocaine use has decreased with the popularity of meth. Cocaine is more expensive than meth and may  be sold with heroin    

Slang: White, Yeah, Coca, Cola, Yola.

Look for: Cocaine is a white, flaky, almost shiny powder (more like flour than meth), often kept tightly wrapped in plastic bags or baggies. They may also be tightly wrapped in small pieces of balloons. Rock Cocaine (for smoking) looks like waxy dried white or almond-colored bread.

Paraphernalia: Very small spoons, small mirrors with razor blades, snort tubes rolled dollar bills, a piece of cut straw, hollow tube of a pen. Dealers will use scales for measurement. 

Storage: Plastic baggies or glass vials, snuff-type dispensers with tiny spoons attached. 

Mushrooms

Mushrooms are a hallucinogen that can be used alone, or treated with LSD. Dried mushrooms often smell bad.

Slang: Shrooms.

Look for: dried mushrooms in plastic baggies. Maybe found with LSD or marijuana. 
Hideaway Containers

People involved in the use or distribution of illegal substances often use hideaway containers. The photograph provided on the right is an example of the kind of things you may encounter. Things are not always as they appear.

LSD

LSD is not common in the Palmer area but can be easy to conceal. Palmer Police find, like club drugs, LSD may be distributed at parties.   

Slang: Acid, Fry. When a user is high on acid, they’re frying.

Look for: tiny, pills-sized papers. A drop of liquid LSD is put on a tiny piece of paper that users put in their mouth. Users will discard stained paper that may be wrapped in foil. Liquid breath freshener bottles with dispensers can be emptied out and filled with LSD. Drops are hits. LSD can be put on candy - look for discolored candy wrapped in foil. 

Ecstasy

Ecstasy is a Club Drug; pills often sold or given out at bars, parties or raves (underground parties). One pill is usually a dose  for the night.

Slang: E, E-tard, E-Bomb when taken with Vics Vapor Rub to enhance the high, Double stack when pills are doubled up. 

Look For: pills with pop culture icons printed on them. Popular icons include a crown, dollar signs, Mickey Mouse, designer logos like CK. Users will often suck on baby pacifiers.  

Storage: Pills are often kept in baggies or other containers so they’re not crushed or broken.

Marijuana

Palmer Police find marijuana is probably the most widely used illegal drug in the valley.

Slang: Chronic, Dank, Weed, Bud, Green. When high on marijuana, users say someone is baked.

Look for: Marijuana is often kept in baggies. Users may have stickers with the numbers 420, which means time to smoke, or 840, double the high. Clocks may be set to these 4:20 or 8: 40. Users may have clothing or posters with marijuana or hemp symbols, or bong on t-shirts and clothing.

Paraphernalia: pipes, bongs, scales, rolling papers, scales. Glass pipes are popular. Pipes and bongs may be bought or homemade.

Storage: zip-lock baggies (found with residue), wooden boxes, film canisters, other unique small storage containers.