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Frequently Asked Questions

I think my vehicle was impounded. What do I do?

You can contact Dispatch at 745-4811 to verify that the Palmer Police Department impounded your vehicle.  If you are interested in obtaining a vehicle release, you must be the registered or legal owner of the vehicle.  Your vehicle must have current registration, and you will need to provide current photo identification prior to release.  A vehicle release fee may be required for the towing and storage of the vehicle.

I received a traffic ticket. Where do I pay my fine?

All tickets must be paid either at the Palmer Courthouse Clerk's Office, located at 435 S. Denali St. in Palmer, or you may be able to pay it online at http://courtrecords.alaska.gov/ep/.

What do I do if a moose won't let me in/out of my house?

Contact PPD at 745-4811.  An officer will respond to assist you.

How do I register my bike?

Bring your bike to PPD; the Administrative Assistant will have the registration forms and identification stickers for each bike.  The Palmer Police Department does not guarantee that if your bike is stolen or lost it will be recovered by filling out and submitting the registration.  No program guarantees a 100% recovery rate.  This is just one of the tools we use to assist owners in getting their property back.  A good number of citizens that report stolen bikes each year do not have the serial number or good identifying information.  Registering your bike not only ensures this information is known but is properly recorded as well.  It is beneficial for owners to keep a copy of this information for their own records.  The PPD encourages citizens to utilize bike locks or secure their bikes in some other way to deter theft.

What is the curfew law?

Anyone under the age of 18 is considered a juvenile.  All juveniles must be home between midnight - 5:00 AM.  Exceptions to this are when a juvenile is coming home directly from a place of employment, emergencies, or if the juvenile has written permission from a parent or legal guardian to perform a specific errand and return directly home.  Parents and business owners need to remember that they also can be cited for curfew violations by allowing juveniles to be out after hours.  For details regarding curfew laws, visit section 9.67 of the Palmer Municipal Code at http://www.codepublishing.com/AK/palmer.html.

What is the law on tinted windows?

State law requires all passenger vehicles allow at least 70% light through the windshield and front side windows.  The rear window and rear side windows must allow at least 40% of the light through.  Violation of this carries a $150 fine.

What is the time frame to have studded snow tires?

Studded snow tires are only legal between the dates of September 15 - April 30 of each year.

I need information about child car seat. Where do I found out what Alaska law requires?

Go to http://www.carseatsak.org/Links/Index.cfm?fuseaction=AlaskaLaw for answers to all your questions.  If you need more information or would like a PPD officer to verify that your car seat is properly installed, feel free to contact the Palmer Police at any time.

I am having a dispute with my landlord (or tenant), what are my rights?

Go to http://law.alaska.gov/pdf/consumer/LandlordTenant_web.pdf for information about the Alaska Landlord/Tenant Act.

Can I get forms from the Court online?

Yes. Go to http://courts.alaska.gov/forms/index.htm for Court Forms?

I have personal property related to a case being held by PPD. How can I retrieve it?

Call 745-4811 and ask to speak with the Evidence Custodian. Be prepared to provide her with your name, the item description and the case with which the property is associated.

How do I get a temporary Restraining Order?

As always, in case of an emergency, call 9-1-1.

Note: Most of the following information was taken directly from the Alaska Court System website. If a person has stalked or sexually assaulted you, or you have been involved in a Domestic Violence incident, you can ask the court to order the person to stay away from you and not contact you. A request for a “protective order” is a civil matter, not a criminal matter. If you want the stalker or assailant to be prosecuted criminally, you need to report the incident(s) to the police.

The first step is to complete the necessary paperwork, which can be found at the courthouse or online at https://akcipowizard.truefiling.com/ if the occurrence is a Domestic Violence situation or http://www.courts.alaska.gov/forms/civ-752.pdf if it is stalking or sexual assault in nature.

Use the Stalking or Sexual Assault Protective Order Packet if the person you want protection from is a friend, student at the same school you attend, neighbor, co-worker, a landlord or tenant, or someone you do not know. You should fill out a Domestic Violence Petition (DV-100) if the stalker or assailant is your spouse or former spouse, parent, grandparent, your child, grandchild, brother or sister, your first cousin, aunt or uncle, nephew or niece, someone who you presently or previously had a dating or sexual relationship with, current or former roommate, or a person related or formerly related to you by marriage (for example a stepparent, stepchild).

I was in an accident and the officer said I needed a Financial Responsibility form. What is that and how do I get one?

If the officer at the scene did not issue one to you, then go to http://state.ak.us/dmv/forms/pdfs/466.pdf to print out a form and for directions on where to send it. If this is not an option, you can stop by the PPD at any time and an Officer would be happy to provide a form to you.

What can I do if I am a victim of an internet crime?

Please go to the website at http://www.ic3.gov/default.aspx and click on "File a Complaint" to report the internet crime. If you have any questions, please feel free to contact the Palmer Police at 745-4811. Please remember there are many different types of fraud being perpetrated on the internet. Do not give out any personal information over the internet to anyone as legitimate companies will not ask for it. If it sounds too good to be true, it probably is illegal.

Why do Officers act the way they do during a traffic stop?

Each year many officers are killed and thousands more are injured while performing traffic related duties. Every stop, even the most common traffic violation, has the potential for danger. There is no such thing as a “routine traffic stop”.

During traffic stops an officer can come across uninsured drivers, drivers with suspended/revoked driver’s licenses, drivers impaired by alcohol and/or drugs, people in possession of illegal firearms and drugs, and drivers and passengers with arrest warrants. These are just a few of the reasons why officers are trained to place a great deal of emphasis on their safety and take a defensive posture at a stop until the risk of confrontation or injury is diminished.

What Can You Do if You Are Stopped?

If you are stopped by a police officer, here are some guidelines that both drivers and passengers can follow to help reduce the risk the danger to the officer and get you back on your way.

  • Always carry proper identification: a valid driver's license, proof of vehicle registration and current proof of insurance.
  • After you stop, stay in your vehicle and keep your seat belt fastened until the officer has seen you wearing it. If you are asked to exit the vehicle, do it slowly.
  • Roll down your window all the way, so the officer can communicate with you.
  • Remain calm, and please stop using your cell phone and/or turn down your vehicle’s radio.
  • Do not duck down or make sudden movements, especially toward the floorboard, rear seat, or passenger side of the vehicle. The officer may interpret these movements as an attempt to hide illegal items or to obtain a weapon.
  • Give the officer a chance to explain the violation. Most officers are trained to ask for identification and registration first before providing an explanation of the stop. This is to avoid debating the reason for the stop prior to acquiring this necessary information.
  • If the charge or citation is not clear, ask for an explanation.
  • Don’t be alarmed if another police officer arrives at the stop. Police officers often stop to see if the officer needs any assistance during a traffic stop.